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Inuit mystery novel

Hunter’s Daughter – Arctic Mystery

A tense literary mystery; an intimate encounter with Inuit life of the recent past.

A chill wind swept in over the bay-ice, and the huskies set up a mad barking at the approach of the stranger. 

Nilliq expected to see the dogsled veer in to shore through an opening in the ice wall. Instead the driver headed straight toward her on the big rock.

A journey begins, to forge a new identity in an ancient land.

Northern Quebec, 1964. A young Inuit woman flees the hunting camp of her father, overland with a mysterious shaman. Mountie Jack McLain sets out in cold pursuit of a killer, and justice… HQ be damned.

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“This is by far the best book I have received through Library Thing’s Early Reviewers’ program…. A fascinating story… great story-telling.” – a Library Thing review

“Congratulations on a real winner. A very interesting book set in a fascinating place. And a bold experiment in narrative style.” – Nate Briggs, Kindle Book Review

I love the simplicity of the style, and how that bareness of words (like the bareness of the environment) captures so much mood and evokes a strange tension.” – Donni Hakanson (author, Oracle of the Dreamtime)

Associated genres: literaryhistorical, mystery, women’s fiction, multicultural

Order eBook now for: Kobo  or Kindle (US) | (Can)
Apple iTunes | Google Play | Barnes & Noble | Indigo | Indie Bound

Price Alert! Canadian customers can save over 40% on the paperback edition by ordering from the publisher’s website. Order now and pay only Can$22.99! Ebook only Can$4.99.

Order Paperback (302 pages): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Five Rivers Publishing (Ontario)

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 More about Hunter’s Daughter

Arctic landscapeMountie Jack McLain, baffled by a series of unsolved murders, knows the latest case will make or break his career. Eighteen-year-old Nilliq, chafing under the sullen power of her father in a remote hunting camp, risks flight with a headstrong shaman bent on a mission of his own. Their paths intersect in this tense mystery charting a journey of personal and cultural transformation. The narrative voice alternates between the urgency of duty in Jack’s quest and the poetic sensibility of Nilliq’s worldview.

Hunter’s Daughter portrays the culture of the Eastern Arctic at a pivotal point of transition to settlements. It delves into topical themes of cultural friction and assimilation, and concerns for the environment, along with emerging women’s issues. The characters (and readers) are challenged to confront and question conventional notions of justice and cultural identity, loyalty and integrity, truth and falsehood, hypothesis and illusion. Can the truth ever be known, and more important, does it really matter, compared to what one discovers about one’s own core beliefs and destiny?

The novel draws on my three years of experience living in Inuit villages where I worked as a teacher in the late 1970s. My students were the first generation to grow up in settlements – their parents lived on the land, in tents and igloos.

The authentic atmosphere of Hunter’s Daughter is reminiscent of the award-winning film Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner (2001); Smilla’s Sense of Snow (1997),  the film based on Peter Hoeg’s bestseller; and the films and books of Canadian writer Farley Mowat. Other comparable authors and works includeUmberto Eco (The Name of the Rose), Jim Harrison (Dalva), Iris Murdoch, and Russell Banks (Affliction).

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Read Chapter One of Hunter’s Daughter here.

Order eBook now for: Kobo  or Kindle (US) | (Can) or Apple iTunes or Google Play

Price Alert! Canadian customers can save over 40% on the paperback edition by ordering from the publisher’s website. Order now and pay only Can$22.99! Ebook only Can$4.99.

Order Paperback (302 pages): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Five Rivers Publishing (Ontario)